Chloroquine in hepatic dysfunction

Discussion in 'Health Canada Drug Database' started by revolution, 07-Mar-2020.

  1. etalon3000 XenForo Moderator

    Chloroquine in hepatic dysfunction


    Controlled studies in pregnant women show no evidence of fetal risk. Either animal studies show no risk but human studies not available or animal studies showed minor risks and human studies done and showed no risk. Animal studies show risk and human studies not available or neither animal nor human studies done. Contact the applicable plan provider for the most current information. D: Use in LIFE-THREATENING emergencies when no safer drug available.

    Plaquenil and oxymetazoline hydrochloride Chloroquine and g6pd Synthesis of chloroquine from m chloroaniline

    Chloroquine Phosphate. Chloroquine is used to prevent or treat malaria caused by mosquito bites in countries where malaria is common. Malaria parasites can enter the body through these mosquito bites, and then live in body tissues such as red blood cells or the liver. If the dosage of hydroxychloroquine utilized is higher than 6.5 mg/kg/day or 3 mg/kg/day for chloroquine, or if the patient is obese, has renal or liver dysfunction, has concomitant macular disease, or is more than 60 years of age, screening should be performed at least annually. Porphyria cutanea tarda PCT is a type of porphyria or blood disorder that affects the skin. PCT is one of the most common types of porphyria. It’s sometimes referred to colloquially as vampire.

    Active against erythrocytic forms of Plasmodium vivax & P. malariae and most strains of Plasmodium falciparum Precise mechanism not known Bioavailability: ~89% Peak plasma time: 1-2 hr Distributed widely in body tissues (eg, eyes, heart, kidneys, liver, lungs) where retention prolonged; crosses placenta; enters breast milk Partially in liver Half-life: 3-5 days Excretion: urine (~70% as unchanged drug); acidification of urine increases elimination Small amounts may be present in urine months following discontinuation of therapy The above information is provided for general informational and educational purposes only.

    Chloroquine in hepatic dysfunction

    Chloroquine - FDA prescribing information, side effects., Chloroquine Retinopathy - an overview ScienceDirect Topics

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  4. With hepatic disease or alcoholism or in conjunction with known hepatotoxic drugs. Central Nervous System Effects Chloroquine may increase the risk of convulsions in patients with a history of.

    • CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE, USP.
    • Porphyria Cutanea Tarda Pictures, Treatment, and More.
    • Chloroquine - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses.

    Hydroxychloroquine is a derivative of chloroquine that has both antimalarial and antiinflammatory activities and is now most often used as an antirheumatologic agent in systemic lupus erythematosis and rheumatoid arthritis. Hydroxychloroquine therapy has not been associated with liver function abnormalities and is an extremely rare cause of clinically apparent acute liver injury. Caution with hepatic disease, alcoholism, and coadministration with other hepatotoxic drugs May provoke seizures in patients with history of epilepsy Antacids and kaolin reduce chloroquine absorption; separate administration by at least 4 hr Irreversible retinal damage observed in some patients; significant risk factors. Hydroxychloroquine is an antimalarial drug which is relatively safe and well-tolerated agent for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Chloroquine is another antimalarial agent that is also sometimes used.

     
  5. adalterrr Guest

    Chloroquine has long been used in the treatment or prevention of malaria from Plasmodium vivax, P. malariae, excluding the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, for it started to develop widespread resistance to it. Chloroquine - Wikipedia Hydroxychloroquine - Alberta Rheumatology Chloroquine phosphate Aralen in the long-term treatment of.
     
  6. ibmed XenForo Moderator

    Medicines for the Prevention of Malaria While Traveling. Chloroquine? CDC has no limits on the use of chloroquine for the prevention of malaria. When chloroquine. is used at higher doses for many years, a rare eye condition called retinopathy has occurred. People who take chloroquine for more than five years should get regular eye exams. For more information Check out the CDC malaria website at

    Chloroquine Aralen - Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions - Drugs